Moses Smashing the Tablets of the Law
Rembrandt: Date: 1659

Evangelical Professors Give Moses an “F” in Ethics

In On Faith today I have a piece on violence in the Bible (“Let There Be Violence?”), which might not sit well with some. In this piece I bring to the foreground the violence in the Old Testament, and particularly those passages where it appears that God is endorsing this violence (e.g. the slaughter of women and children). The article features interviews with Christian academics, especially evangelicals, who take issue with the violence portrayed in the Old Testament. Letting these voices speak is my primary reason for writing this piece.

Most often, the conservative right in the evangelical world are those who set the tone for how to read the Bible. The insistence upon reading the Bible as history and without error leads to the endorsement of very disturbing passages, which Continue reading…

Clarence-Darrow-Scopes-Monkey-Trial

Academic Freedom and the Anti-Evolution Movement at Bryan College

My new article “The Casualties of Bryan College’s Anti-Evolution Revolution” is up at The Huffington Post. In it I look at the controversy surfacing at Bryan College with the new creationist statement that faculty will be obligated to sign. In writing, Consider No Evil: Two Faith Traditions and the Problem of Academic Freedom in Religious Higher Education (forthcoming, 2014), my co-author (Menachem Wecker) and I ran across no shortage of stories involving institutions of higher education returning to their creationist roots. Bryan is just one among many and likely many more to come.

Dayton, Tennessee, perhaps best-known for being the location of the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial, is back in the news with a controversy at Bryan College, named for William Jennings Bryan, the anti-evolutionist counsel at Scopes. As of a recent board meeting, the faculty at the college Continue reading…

"The Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Paradise"  Benjamin West (1791).

The Problems of Creationism

My newest article, “‘There is a book,’ but Ken Ham has no idea how to read it,” is up at Toledo Faith and Values (a local hub for the Religion News Service). In it I offer a critique of creationism, and specifically Ken Ham. It is a post Ham-Nye debate article that I hesitated to write, especially since there was so much already said. (I decided to ignore that voice in my head and do it anyway.) Continue reading…

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Speaking at Butler University (Feb. 22): Updated

I’m speaking to a group of students at Butler University’s The Center for Faith and Vocation on February 22 on academic freedom and religious higher education. Our conversation will be based (in part) on my forthcoming book, Consider No Evil: Two Faith Traditions and the Problem of Academic Freedom in Religious Higher Education. I’m planning to return the following Tuesday (Feb. 25) to hear Mary Burgan speak (emeritus professor of English at Indiana University) and respondents Steve Sanders (associate professor at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law in Bloomington) and Pete Enns (Christian studies professor at Eastern University in Pennsylvania). Thanks to James McGrath for the invite.

Update: Had a great time at Butler on Saturday. Over at his blog, Exploring Our Matrix, James McGrath has a post about the meeting with students and a few takeaways.

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The “Consider No Evil” Book Cover

Consider No Evil: Two Faith Traditions and the Problem of Academic Freedom in Religious Higher Education (Forthcoming, Cascade 2014).

Consider No Evil: Two Faith Traditions and the Problem of Academic Freedom in Religious Higher Education (Forthcoming, Cascade 2014).

This is (tentatively) the cover for Consider No Evil: Two Faith Traditions and the Problem of Academic Freedom in Religious Higher Education (Cascade Books, 2014), which I’ve co-authored with Menachem Wecker and is likely to be out next summer. Still seems so far away, but I’m sure it will come soon enough. The cover image is “The Death of Socrates” (Jacques-Louis David, 1787), which is appropriate since Continue reading…

Aronofsky-Noah

My new article on Aronofsky’s “Noah”

Aronofsky-Full-PosterA short while back I wrote a piece (“Aronofsky’s “Noah” can be epic, but there’s a catch”) over at our local hub of the Religion News Service called Toledo Faith & Values on Darren Aronofsky’s upcoming movie “Noah.” For some reason, I’m always a little slow getting notices up on this blog versus my other blog, The Discarded Image. At any rate, here it is:

‘Noah,’which features big names like Russell Crowe (Noah), Jennifer Connelly (Noah’s wife), Emma Watson, and Anthony Hopkins (Methuselah), can be more than a ‘Waterworld’ prequel; it can be better than a Bible tract on the big screen; it could even be epic. Epic films explore the nature of humanity on a impressive scale. They center on a hero whose ambitious journey follows an exotic landscape. Like ‘The Lord of the Rings,’ it may include incredible creatures, extravagant costume, and fantastic scores. Noah can be like this, but first Aronofsky needs to commit a few evangelical sins…. Read the full article at Toledo Faith & Values.